Rhubarb Recipes & Why You Should Grow Rhubarb

Rhubarb is in season now. The tender stalks can be cooked in so many different recipes, from crumbles, cookies and cakes to jams and chutneys. Not only does it have a lovely taste, it is good for you and is easy to grow in your own garden or in a container on your patio.

Rhubarb Crumble
Rhubarb Crumble

How To Grow Rhubarb

It really is so easy to grow – it must be because I’ve grown it for many years now, and every Spring it produces plenty of tender and juicy stalks for me!

Rhubarb grown in my garden
Rhubarb Grown In My Garden

I grow mine in a small bed at the end of the garden, but you can grow it in a large container. I purchased a crown from a local garden centre and planted it. I’m just your average gardener, or rather my wife Jane is, and growing this fruit takes very little effort. All we do is pick the stems, and then in Autumn we cut back the old stalks and apply well composted chicken manure around the crown of the plant. Our rescued hens provide an abundance of chicken manure!!

Rhubarb Is Good For You

Rhubarb is packed with nutrients and contains few calories (100g contains only 21 calories). Organic Facts lists the following seven health benefits of eating it:

  • Reduces risk of cardiovascular diseases.
  • Stimulates production of red blood cells.
  • Aids in weight loss
  • Strengthens digestive system
  • Helps prevent Alzheimer’s disease.
  • Stimulates bone growth and repair.
  • Prevents cancer and macular degeneration.

It is also claimed that it:

  • Improves vision as it contains vitamin C and lutein.
  • Reduces hot flushes due to the presence of phytoestrogens.
  • Delays the signs of ageing and prevents skin infections due to the fact that it is rich in vitamin A.

Rhubarb Recipes

Rhubarb Crumble

Rhubarb Crumble

An easy recipe for this classic British dessert – a crisp and crumbly topping covering sweet juicy fruit underneath. Served with hot custard or double cream, it’s comfort food at its best!

My previous blog referred to the health benefits of apples. Why not mix the fruit and bake a Rhubarb & Apple Crumble?

Rhubarb & Almond Cake

rhubarb and almond cake

A delicious moist cake with rhubarb and almonds. One slice is never enough!

Chocolate & Rhubarb Oaty Cookies

Chocolate and Rhubarb Oaty Cookies

These taste incredible! Crisp on the outside and chewy in the middle. A nutritious snack.

Rhubarb Ginger & Walnut Bread

Rhubarb Ginger and walnut Bread

If you like freshly made bread then this recipe is a must! A yeast dough layered with a sharp fruit and ginger coated crunchy walnuts. Delicious!!

Rhubarb Chutney

Rhubarb Chutney

This chutney is not so well known yet it delivers an incredible tangy flavour. Superb for sandwiches with cold meats or cheese. Why not give it a go?

How To Freeze Rhubarb

If you grow your own rhubarb, after a few years you are likely to have more than you can eat or give away. It is, however, simple to freeze and then you can use it over the winter months.

  • Cut off the leaves.
  • Remove all the imperfections in the stems.
  • Wash & dry the stems.
  • Chop into small & even pieces.
  • Put into a freezer bag & empty it of all the air.
  • Freeze.

If you have a patio or garden then I would recommend growing rhubarb. You will then be able to pick the freshest produce possible and there are no food miles. Be aware, however, that the leaves are poisonous. The stems are simply delicious and can be used in a wide variety of dishes. On top of this, it is good for you.

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Winter Vegetables with an Oaty Crumble Topping

Winter vegetables in a béchamel sauce topped with an oaty crumble and grated mature cheddar cheese – this recipe is not only delicious, it’s nutritious too.  Although we are experiencing Spring-like weather at the moment, temperatures are set to drop and when they do we’re more likely to crave comfort food.  What’s good about this recipe is that whilst we’re indulging in comfort food it’s good for us too with nutrient packed winter vegetables.

Winter Vegetables with an Oaty Topping

Brexit Food Shortages – Should You Be Worried

Brexit food shortages are a concern for many of us.  Is it a possibility?  Should I stockpile food?  If we leave the EU, where will our food come from?  Will food prices increase?  Will the quality of our food be compromised?  Will there actually be Brexit food shortages or is it scaremongering?

brexit food shortages

I decided to carry out some research and this is what I found:

Student – How to eat cheaply!

I know better than anyone what it feels like to be a broke student. The amount of times I’ve hit the bottom of my overdraft is quite scary. Then the student loan comes in, and I think I’m rich – for about two weeks.

If you’re on this website, it’s probably because you’re looking for a new recipe to try out,  or you’re interested in how companies in your area give back to their communities. This article won’t help you with either of those things. However, if you’re looking for help on making delicious food with a small budget, you have come to the right place.

Let’s start with the obvious. Ready meals are not cheap. Even if they’re frozen! The price says 3 for £6 at ASDA so you think, what a bargain! But the portions are small, and that’s only going to last you three dinners! Also, if we’re being honest, cheap ready meals from ASDA do not taste good and definitely aren’t good for you, no matter what they put on the label. The salt and preservatives stuffed into one of them almost gives me a heart attack by looking at it, and I haven’t taken a bite yet! That’s not to say I’ve never eaten one. In my first year of uni I had more ready meals than I could count on four, maybe five hands! And how did I feel after eating them? Gross, undernourished and hungry! Ready meals are the easiest things to cook. It’d be pretty hard to do it wrong, but is it worth it?

As long as you have the basics in your fridge and cupboards, you can make a nutritious and delicious meal for just as cheap as a ready meal. When I say the basics, I’m talking flour, salt, pepper, stock cubes, garlic and tomato puree and milk etc. These are the basics for a lot of meals! The initial cost will be slightly higher to buy these items, but as soon as you have them they should last you a long time! I’m still on the same bag of flour I bought in September!

Soon, you’ll find that your weekly shop really goes down in price. Have a look at some of the recipes on this website for some cheap, and easy meals with bare minimum ingredients. Some that I would recommend would be Spaghetti Bolognaise, Chicken Curry and Lasagne. Imagine being able to say that you can cook these dishes from scratch! It’s a lot easier than it sounds, trust me.

Chicken & Mushroom Curry – Quick & Easy to Make

Chicken and Mushroom Curry is a quick and easy dish to make.  It is a favourite of my daughters’ and made in one pan – so less washing up!  It’s delicious served with rice and/or poppadoms and mango chutney.  I use brown rice because I prefer it, but it can be served with long grain rice or even pasta.

chicken and mushroom curry served with brown rice and mango chutney

Ingredients

  • 1 tbsp Cooking Oil
  • 1 Small Chopped Onion
  • 2 Cloves Garlic
  • 2 tsp Tomato Puree
  • 1 Chicken Oxo Cube
  • 60g Raisins
  • 1 dsp Jam
  • Seasoning
  • 2 Raw Diced Chicken Breast
  • 120g Chopped Mushrooms
  • 2 tbsp Plain Flour
  • 300ml Milk
  • 300ml Water
  • 200g Brown Rice

ingredients for chicken and mushroom curry

Method

1  Place the oil in a pan over a moderately high temperature, & when hot, add the chopped onion, garlic, tomato puree, oxo cube, raisins & jam.

cooking a chicken curry 1

2  After 2 minutes, add the diced chicken breast & cook until the chicken shows no sign of pink flesh.

3  Add the mushrooms.

4  Stir in the plain flour.

cooking a chicken curry 2

5  Add the milk & water, stirring well.

6  Simmer over a low heat for 20 minutes, stirring occasionally.

cooking a chicken curry 3

7  In a separate saucepan boil a litre of water. Add the rice & continue to cook for 20 minutes & then drain.

This recipe for Chicken & Mushroom Curry serves two, so is simple to adapt for a single person or a family.  As both my daughters are students, I often make the curry in bulk and freeze it in individual portions for them to reheat at university. Having said that, they often use this recipe (sometimes adapting it to use the ingredients they have) and make chicken curry themselves.

For an even simpler recipe for chicken curry for one, click here